Inductees - 2012


Henry R. Buckaloo

Henry R. Buckaloo

 

Henry R. Buckaloo (1900-1973) was born in Port Norris, NJ, and moved to Lewes in 1932. He came from a family of watermen.
Henry owned 3 oyster boats, dock facilities employing many boat crews and captains in Lewes, Rehoboth, and Port Mahon.  He was the first to plant and harvest oysters in the Rehoboth Bay.  Delaware Wildlife bought land he owned on the St. Jones River and named it the Buckaloo Tract.
Henry participated in the diving endeavor over the shipwreck HMS DeBraak, featured in The Saturday Evening Post in 1954.  He partnered with Otis Smith and rebuilt and repaired Smith's fish docks, and built the Lewes city dock while Smith was mayor.  Henry bulkheaded the western Canal bank from the railroad bridge to Smith's property.  He also managed Smith’s oystering interests. 
Henry was appointed to three consecutive terms on the Delaware River Pilots Commission starting in 1961, received a Distinguished Service Award from President Lyndon Johnson in appreciation for promoting nationwide observance of United Nations Day in 1964.  He was appointed to the Shellfish Advisory Council of Game and Fish Commission in 1971.
Henry Buckaloo’s efforts to rebuild and bulkhead the docks along the canal have had a significant and lasting impact.  The city dock has generated untold visits to Lewes by private and historical vessels whose owners and their crews have benefited from his efforts.  It is for this reason that Henry Buckaloo is being inducted to this year’s Delaware Maritime Hall of Fame.


Jeanette Killen

Jeanette Killen

 

Jeanette Killen was born in Smyrna Landing, Delaware, in 1924.  She grew up in a waterman’s family observing local fishing, crabbing, and oystering.  She married a waterman, Harry Killen, at age sixteen and worked with him on his boats.  One, the Maggie S. Myers, was Delaware’s oldest (1893) working oyster schooner.  She worked on boats part time when no crabbing licenses were required.  Jeanette received the first Delaware woman’s commercial crabbing license, and continues to hold current crab and oyster licenses in 2012.  She ran a crab boat out of Leipsic full time until 1967, then part time until 2008.
Respected for her knowledge of the Delaware Bay waters, she keeps in touch with current watermen, doing maintenance on boats, and working with her grandson.  When the oystering business declined in the late 1950’s and 1960’s, she took a job in the commissioner of Elections Office and was credited with the early automation of Delaware’s elections.
Holding licenses in both Delaware and New Jersey, she participated with her husband in the efforts to revive the oyster industry.  Dredging oysters and net fishing in winter, crabbing in summer helped support the community.  Jeannette made regular donations of crabs to the Leipsic Volunteer Fire Company, held crab parties in her basement, and cooked crabs on the dock on weekends for sale.  She was especially active during the Bicentennial, providing tours and boat rides on the Maggie S. Myers.  The Delaware Maritime Hall of Fame is proud to recognize her outstanding waterman’s career.


William J. Miller, Jr.

William J. Miller, Jr.

 

William J. Miller, Jr. was born in Wilmington in 1917.  After graduating from Drexel University as a Civil Engineer and distinguishing himself during World War II, Mr. Miller returned to Delaware.  In 1963 he was appointed the first Executive Director of the Delaware River and Bay Authority, and served until 1991.
Under his guidance and in 1968, the “Twin Span” of the Delaware Memorial Bridge was opened in 1968 connecting northern Delaware and New Jersey.
Ferry service began in 1964 under Mr. Miller’s leadership.  The first ferry was secured from the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel District.  Five new world-class vessels would later make the Cape May-Lewes Ferry System not only a transportation link but a major tourist attraction for the entire Delaware Bay.
Bill Miller was chosen Drexel’s Man of the Year, Delaware Outstanding Professional Engineer, President of the Delaware Society of Professional Engineers, President of the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association.  He has served as Chairman of the March of Dimes, Board of the Blood Bank of Delaware, Delaware AAA, Delaware Safety Council and first chairman of the Council of the Laity of the Diocese of Wilmington.
He is a distinguished author of two books, Crossing the Delaware and A Ferry Tale.  The Cape May Lewes Ferry has carried 13,800,000 vehicles and 42,000,000 passengers since its inception.
Bill Miller’s efforts have promoted tourism and commerce and he has left a legacy of service to residents along the shores of the Delaware River and Bay. 


William Reader

William Reader

 

William Reader was born and raised in New Castle.  After graduating from the University of Delaware, Bill worked for 38 years for Hewlett Packard, where he was the site operations manager at its Little Falls site.   
His interest and leadership in preserving Delaware history and maritime heritage has been evident since 1979, when he began his 18-year elected position as a member of the Trustees of the New Castle Common.  He served on the Boards of Directors for the Lewes Historical Society, the Overfalls Foundation, and the Lewes Yacht Club, where he was elected Commodore in 2001 and 2002.
In 2011 Bill was awarded the Historic Naval Ship Association’s Ship Maintenance/Preservation/Exhibition Award.  This award is for a Fleet Member staff or volunteer person who has provided exemplary work on a daily basis toward the long term maintenance and preservation of an historic naval vessel and/or toward the proper exhibition of that vessel to the general public.  
Bill Reader is being inducted into the Hall of Fame because of his twelve year tenure as the leader of the “Dirty Hands Gang,” a volunteer group that restored the Lightship Overfalls LV118, which was declared a National Historic Landmark in 2011.  Bill’s leadership skills made this impossible task a reality.  Clearly he did not do it alone, but his many talents brought together the resources and established an environment in which it could happen.  He is widely recognized for his talents which include the ability to plan, administer, motivate, supervise and manage. 


Nancy M. Targett

Nancy M. Targett

 

Nancy M. Targett joined the University of Delaware College of Marine Studies faculty in 1984.  Dr. Targett grew up in Pittsburgh and received her Ph.D. from the University of Maine.  She came to the University of Delaware from the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography in Savannah, GA, where she was an assistant research professor. 

Her scientific area of expertise is marine chemical ecology.  She developed an artificial bait for horseshoe crabs which is currently in commercial testing, and she demonstrated that phlorotannins in brown algae do not follow the latitudinal gradient as previous thought.  She was an aquanaut on three missions to HydroLab, an underwater habitat deployed near St. Croix.  She has mentored numerous graduate and under graduate students.  Dr. Targett served as Dean of the Marine College since 2005 after serving as Associate Dean for five years. 

As dean, Dr. Targett has worked to keep UD at the forefront of ocean science and education.  Believing strongly that earth and ocean systems are linked, she moved the College of Marine Studies to embrace a broader footprint, ultimately becoming the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment.  This has enhanced the College’s visibility and its impact.  Dr. Targett also serves as Director of the Delaware Sea Grant Program whose mission is to deliver science that informs the citizens of Delaware’s coast.  Dr. Targett is a board member for the Greater Lewes Foundation, for the Cadbury retirement community, and formerly for St. Thomas More Academy, and a founding board member for the Jefferson School and for the Sussex Academy of Arts and Sciences. 

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